Explaining EDM America to British Dance Music Elitists

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A response to Clive Martin’s handy guide/open letter to America.

Britons,

Thank you, for the recent “explanation” of rave culture. On behalf of my fellow Americans, I’d like to thank you for the advice on how to handle our dance music scene. However, there are few things you might not quite understand. I am more than happy to break it down, or bring it up, as it were, to your haughty heights.Electric Zoo by BennettSell-Kline You have rightly noted that it was you Europeans who have baked this dance music cake we are now stuffing our faces with. True, the ingredients were originally ours… raised in the dingy bars of Detroit, the foggy warehouses of San Francisco, and the reverberating discos of Manhattan. Then we gave them to you, let you knead that dough and ensure it was properly fluffy and moist before we took a big bite. Now we’re having this EDM cake and eating it too.

You see, for much of the last 25 years, we enjoyed electronica/house/techno/ EDM/what have you, in the confines of tiny clubs, similar to the ones you were in. True, we didn’t go as hard on the rave thing until lately, but we didn’t judge you for it. We didn’t think it made you gay (not that there’s anything wrong with that) or existentialists (we don’t know what that means). We just thought it was a virtue of being pasty, pill-poppers so desperate for sunshine and/or an escape from the confines of your socialist lives that you’d settle for any sort of “super-loud repetitive music that hasn’t changed since the mid-90′s” (to quote Ted Mosby). Please look me in the eye with your dinner plate-wide pupils and tell me Pacha in 2003 sounds drastically different from Ministry in 1997 or Creamfields in 2006 or Radio 1 during any ten year period between Blue Lines and “When Love Takes Over.” Do you want us to admire you for liking Airdrawndagger or something?

The thing is, when the US got fully in the game, the game stepped up. Electronic music of all forms has exploded into the mainstream, but also throughout the underground. The confluence of accessible production technologies and expansive digital access has led to more diverse material for broader-than-ever audiences. And it has us making heart-hands.

So here’s a shot fired back at you, for your dithering and dead-wrong assault on our Yankee raver ways.

YOU’RE WRONG! NOT ALL DANCE MUSIC IS ELECTRONIC! AND WE’RE NOT IDIOTS!
I could dignify your contention that “all dance music is electronic” with a condescending explanation about deep house, vinyl, and the history of live orchestras in disco. Instead, I’ll just tell you that the Dave Matthews Band makes many Americans dance and they’re not electronic. Also, don’t call us idiots, you thieving, would-be-speaking-German-if-it-weren’t-for-us, cheap little man!

Admittedly, we haven’t been that adept at naming our genres over the years – Modern Rock of the 90s made as little sense as Indie Rock did in the 00s. But while you sort that out for us, we’ll be on the dancefloor, going HAM over some sick new EDM.

LIVE DRUMS ARE AMAZING, TOTALLY ACCEPTABLE, BUT, LIKE, WHERE DO YOU HEAR THEM?
Didn’t Underworld used to have live drums in their set? That aside, a few years ago I got really into Infusion. They hail from your former penal colony, I believe? Anyway, they use some live percussion and it’s pretty ravetastic. Robert DeLong is a new American artist who does the same. Beyond that, I’m not sure where you’re seeing these live drums at the rave, but please do share! It sounds exciting! We’re a nation of marching band drumlines, Tommy Lee, and beach bongo campfire circles with Matthew McConaughey, so this live drumming you speak of suits us just fine.

TRV$

 

IF YOU HAVE TO TALK ABOUT HOW WE’RE TALKING ABOUT DRUGS…
You’re totally that guy who wants to lecture everyone about the neurochemistry brain science of a drug taking WHILE taking drugs, aren’t you? You English are just so buttoned-up! Here, we’d just call you a wet blanket and lose you in the parking lot. The thing is, lads, we’re not obsessed with our drugs. We do them or we don’t. So what we call them is somewhat irrelevant. As long as our d-boys can decipher our texts, we’re straight. And in case you hadn’t noticed, we’re not too fussed about speaking the King’s English – especially when it concerns narcotics. If that’s of such primary importance to you, maybe you should put down the pipe, or baggie, or whatever it is that has you so jacked up. Also, stay hydrated out there.

YOU’RE RIGHT, WE DON’T NEED A DROP IN EVERY TRACK – BUT WE WANT ONE!
Here’s the problem with you limeys… you’re so committed to rationing your pleasures! So what if there’s a drop in every track? Go for it! You can have three drops in every track and still enjoy three in the next track. Why limit ourselves when it comes to bass? Go for it! Why delay the enjoyment a well-timed fist-pump or head-bang can give a crowd? (Besides, we’re frankly not quite sure how long this whole EDM thing is gonna last, so it’s better to pack ‘em in while we can.)

bassface

IN AMERICA, HOUSE MUSIC IS NOT DRUG MUSIC
Let’s elaborate… I understand that you cannot justify making house music and being anti-drugs if you live in the sunless doldrums of the British Isles. If I saw only gray skies for nine months of the year, I’d want to turn them purple too. But we have a sunnier (and ever warming) climate over here, and drugs are just superfluous to the highs of a good tune. In point of fact, we couldn’t be more proud of our own drug-free superstar DJ, Kaskade. That man kills it coast-to-coast and he doesn’t even drink! It’s just so passé to let your musical tastes be dependant on substances, and if you’re not better than that, we certainly are.

IF DJs AREN’T ROCK STARS THEN WHY DO THEY GET PAID LIKE THEY ARE?
Time was, we couldn’t lure Tiësto, Calvin and the Swedish House Mafiosos over here with enough cash to make it worth their jetlag. Times have changed, and now these boys hold down million dollar residencies in Vegas and headline megafestivals that are paying for their grandkids college educations. It’s definitely a bubble, but until it bursts, the world’s DJs are on top in America. They’re in beer commercials and on MTV. They hook up with reality TV stars and hang out with Jay-Z. Not only that, our promoters are rock stars too! I don’t know if you know who the Tomorrowland promoters are banging, but ask an American raver kid who Electric Daisy Carnival mastermind Pasquale Rotella is fathering a child with and they’ll gladly tell you. Is this wrong? Who’s to say? But even as my British ex-pat friends chide stateside crowds for facing the DJ booth while at church the club, they’d be hard-pressed to argue that the dude at the decks isn’t a bonafide rockstar.

Pas and Holly

IT MAKES US SO VERY HAPPY
The bottom line is that we don’t really care what you think about us. We’re not trying to ape your muddy olde raves of yore. This is our scene, our music, our rules. And as much as you think we don’t “get it,” we know you really don’t get it either. Just stand in the middle of a steamy crowd of thousands under the stars when Skrillex is playing “Cinema” and hear every sweaty glitter-bodied person around you shouting back the lyrics at the top of their lungs like they’re Gary Go and they just landed on the moon with a billion dollars and a pile of puppies. If that doesn’t melt your frosty Anglo heart, I don’t know what will. This – not your dad’s weak-ass 90s MDMA – is what defines ecstasy. We live for moments like these. These moments are why you, my British friends, might do well to learn a thing or two from us.

 

follow Zel at @ZelMcCarthy

78 Comments

  1. Skrillex catches on fire, an American responds to Vice UK’s barbs, and a seven-year-old Ghanaian takes beatboxing to a new level – Beatport News
    January 17, 2013

    [...] – And remember Vice UK’s point-of-view piece on rave culture in the USA? Well, an American sounds off: (full story) [...]

  2. ryan
    January 17, 2013

    That Skrillex video you posted is the worst music i have heard in my life.Jesus Christ.Really not helping you’re case.

    • micaiah
      January 17, 2013

      that is exactly why he won 3 Grammy Awards

      • amok
        January 18, 2013

        no, he won those awards because the Grammys, the Billboards and all other award shows are total nonsense. I’ll prove it to you:
        While being a manager at a music shop years ago, I was in charge of ordering, when we got an order in, there were always singles which were priced at .99c… and we couldn’t legally sell them for more… these were singles of unknown so called “stars” promoted and pushed by the big wigs of the industry. Those would go out to all stores nation wide… and nation wide these were and are put in their neat little places on shelves in every store. As a customer, you walk in, find a CD priced at .99c, you don’t know who it is, but it fits your musical interest… you buy it.. hey, what’s the worst that will happen? It’ll be a beer coaster! Now a week later, this so called “star” sells a half a million .99c CDs… hits number 1 on the billboard best selling artist chart… BANG, a star is made… there… now you know it… hahaha… NONE of the artists on TV or the radio today, nor any of the artists on the TOP world DJ lists are best at anything that they do… and that’s a fact. Guetta and Skrillex are not even DJs, yet they are in the top 100 DJ list hahaha… how’s that for some nonsense… enjoy your reality.

      • Ronan
        January 18, 2013

        Exactly, now he’s up there with songsmiths like Adele and the fucken Dixie Chicks. Well chuffed he must be!

      • face
        January 18, 2013

        wtf is a grammy? something an american created to lower the standards of talent. i dont know what an american is but he or she better stop trying to save the world and save himself from his reality.

      • Boardstorm
        January 18, 2013

        Yes, because the Grammys are a totally relevant and legitimate awards show……. Or not.

      • kranzmc
        January 18, 2013

        …because judging the quality of music based on number of grammys is a reliable indicator of good music?

      • nick
        January 18, 2013

        Grammys. Exactly.

  3. Daniel Neofetou
    January 17, 2013

    skrillex is so fucking shit

    • Nic O
      January 18, 2013

      Eloquent.

  4. sam
    January 17, 2013

    Big Gigantic. Live drums + jaw droppingly amazing electro = big gigantic. I read the redcoat’s article and just wanted to drop a big g bomb on his doorstep.

    • mason
      January 17, 2013

      Big Gigantic came to my mind, and also SBTRKT, who is fucking british! Sure, SBTRKT may not be “EDM”, but it’s still electronic, and it’s dance music, and he plays the drums in his live set.

      • Zel
        January 17, 2013

        LOVE SBTRKT! thank you for reminding me! when done right, you don’t even notice that there are live drums because it just blends in.

  5. DanceFloorAssassin
    January 17, 2013

    An equally embarrassing and poorly written article which is perhaps more frustrating since it attempts to speak for me. Don’t get me wrong, the other guy is an idiot. But…

    You challenged their innovation in sound over the past 25 years by bringing up only artists that fit your point when there are an infinite number who would prove otherwise. You referenced DAVE MATTHEWS BAND to justify all dance music not being electronic? Ouch. You referenced World War II. Just, wow. You didn’t reference the Bays or the Egg in the live drums argument. We want a drop in every track? Please kill me now. You act like we made electronic music mainstream… it was already mainstream around the world, just because it finally became mainstream here is not a credit to us, but us catching up.

    Your drug argument was good though.

    In reality you both need to stfu because it’s the n00bs, the children on drugs, that are an embarrassment to the live music environment and culture, nationality is irrelevant.

    • Zel
      January 17, 2013

      I definitely didn’t address innovation… that’s a whole different story. That line about WWII is actually a quote from an episode of Friends, but I digress.

      Nationality is irrelevant. You can be asshole in any scene, in any country.

      • DanceFloorAssassin
        January 17, 2013

        “I definitely didn’t address innovation… that’s a whole different story. ”

        “We just thought it was a virtue of being pasty, pill-poppers so desperate for sunshine and/or an escape from the confines of your socialist lives that you’d settle for any sort of “super-loud repetitive music that hasn’t changed since the mid-90′s” (to quote Ted Mosby). Please look me in the eye with your dinner plate-wide pupils and tell me Pacha in 2003 sounds drastically different from Ministry in 1997 or Creamfields in 2006 or Radio 1 during any ten year period between Blue Lines and “When Love Takes Over.”

    • amok
      January 18, 2013

      I must agree… none of this has anything to do with the underground US scene, or rave scene in general… and yea, there are drum circles at raves… always had been and that’s just scratching the surface of this ill informed write up… in any case… this article is just as bad as its predecessor.

  6. European
    January 17, 2013

    First off, thank you for your article. It just proved everything right. Only a tiny minded person, would think that the electronic music scene, sounds the same over decades. Listen to more music and learn less skrillex lyrics.. This genre was never about singing. Go back to your backyard “new-born-country”.

  7. hausmusik
    January 17, 2013

    have you ever looked into the history of house music? drugs and that scene are pretty synonymous

  8. Bob
    January 17, 2013

    Kaskade….really! and Cinema is a pop tune.

  9. Alex
    January 17, 2013

    I’m British and I thought the original article you’re responding to was fucking cringeworthy, but you’ve somehow come across as even more of a douche. You sound like such a fucking idiot using the name “Limeys’ and calling us socialist :L
    – “you’re so committed to rationing your pleasures! So what if there’s a drop in every track? Go for it! You can have three drops in every track and still enjoy three in the next track. Why limit ourselves when it comes to bass?” – what I’d say to this is why does dance music have to be about bass and drops? you’ve contradicted yourself – earlier in the article you said “I’ll just tell you that the Dave Matthews Band makes many Americans dance and they’re not electronic” – The Dave Matthews Band never relied on having drops to get people to dance, so why does electronic music need them?
    Aside from this you do put forward some good points in this article, but why does this whole feud have to be about nationality? I saw the original article get hate from both Brits and Americans – it’s nothing to do with where you’re from, but different people’s perceptions on what music is to them. Some people like dance music with subtlety and character, whereas others prefer to be blown away by huge scale over the top wobs and growls. Although I prefer the former, I don’t personally have a problem with either viewpoint, until people start arguing over which is better – it’s an impossible debate as both sides are looking at the question from a completely different perspective.

    • Zel
      January 17, 2013

      Isn’t it funny how calling someone a socialist can be an insult? Personally, I’m ok with socialism.

      You’re right in pointing out how silly this whole debate is, based on axiomatic stereotypes and crude generalizations. Silliness I’ll reinforce by only saying “they started it.” But really… my larger point is that every culture, every scene, every generation as a right and a duty to create and define for themselves who they are and what is important.From DMB to Skrillex… one man’s noise is another’s top tune. It’s all ok with me.

      To paraphrase Walt Whitman… do we contradict ourselves? Very well then. America is large and contains multitudes.

      • Alex
        January 18, 2013

        I’m not saying it’s an insult to call someone socialist, but to call a whole nation socialist when it’s currently governed by Conservatives is just fucking stupid – why is it even worth mentioning in the first place if it’s not meant to be an insult?

  10. josh
    January 17, 2013

    To Ryan (kid with top comment) its “your” not “youre” you dumb ass….and that music is pure bliss.

  11. nevawho
    January 17, 2013

    LOL. and once again an american gets angry because he cant take a look at himself and have a giggle.

    • Zel
      January 17, 2013

      I think the fact that I reference Airdrawndagger AND Holly Madison shows that indeed, I can have a giggle.

  12. Graham
    January 17, 2013

    Aww bless you guys, this was the cringiest shit ive ever read, you dont have an argument.

  13. Charlie
    January 17, 2013

    Some of the stuff you wrote had a bit of truth, it’s not our business to dictate what you do in your rave scene, but SKRILLEX? I just watched that video you posted at the bottom…sounds like an old school PC malfunctioning and spewing out random high pitched noises (that’s the best way I could describe it).

  14. Matty C
    January 17, 2013

    LOL @ Everyone taking the Vice article so seriously.

    Fcuk, Yanks really need to get a sense of humour, its called taking the pi$$ innit ;)

    • Zel
      January 17, 2013

      like I said, the fact that this article namechecks Airdrawndagger demonstrates a considerable sense of humor

  15. Greg F
    January 17, 2013

    I’m just speaking for Trance as I write this… I prefer the British culture of club music because it is the authentic Trance culture. Not just in Great Britain, but all over Europe the club culture is classy and fashionable. I am proud to be an American and I love my country but the rave culture here is a bad representation of Trance Music. In the United States rave culture, people dress very bizarrely and it reminds me of some sort of futuristic hippies. I’m just being completely honest and from my personal preference I think a lot of the stuff I see in the U.S. rave culture is trashy like people wearing loads of tacky colorful bracelets and white gloves with glow lights on the finger tips. It looks really ridiculous and it is NOT true Trance culture. A girl I know from Russia can’t stand the rave culture here in the U.S. because she told me she thinks it looks like a circus. I agree with her. All of the bizarre outfits, loads of tacky colorful bracelets and white gloves with glow lights on the finger tips ruin the elegance of Trance Music. I hope that eventually this tasteless rave culture here in the United States will phase out and I hope to see the true Trance culture, the British and European club culture, emerge more here in the United States.

    • Zel
      January 17, 2013

      thank you for respectfully and thoughtfully expressing your opinion! one thing I love about the Trance Family and most of American EDM is how it allows people to be themselves – sometimes in bright tacky colors. not my style, personally, but it works for them.
      like all things in culture, this too will phase out I’m sure, and who knows what’s coming next?

  16. FluxTrax
    January 17, 2013

    If it weren’t for us Scandinavians you all would have been talking (a) German (dialect), which you technically speaking still do (we just messed it up for you twice).
    Secondly, college education is free in Sweden so I guess the Swedish Douchebag Mafio doesn’t need your dosh for that…

    Was it Scooter in that video?

  17. Paolo
    January 17, 2013

    To be honest this article is just rubbish. You can all keep your Godawful mainstream tunes and dumbass productions, together with your predictable rants about us Europeans and our “socialism”. Please change the (apple macbook) record! YAWN!

  18. Mayday
    January 17, 2013

    If this is a joke, you are funny.

    • Zel
      January 17, 2013

      I mention Airdrawndagger, posted a picture of Holly Madison, and alluded to there being benefits of global warming. Humor obviously intended.

  19. chrisbrownhitoprahwinfreyonce
    January 17, 2013

    The reason you American guys like (American) Dubstep so much is that its like the BPM of rap and it’s easier to dance to because you’re not used to dancing to things with a BPM over 100.

  20. Stu
    January 17, 2013

    The examples of music and artists you mention show your complete lack of knowledge of the scene that you are trying so hard to convince us you know so well. This “EDM” thing you’re into seems like a completely separate entity from the rest of dance music. It’s kind of like trance music mixed with modern-day pop mixed with noisy guitar music. And it’s style over substance. It has no soul, no integrity, and I predict no real longevity. So by all means, enjoy those drops while they last. Just realize you look like a bunch of misguided fools while you do.

    What’s happening here is the same as when that shitty commercial club rap sound blew up in the US in the 00′s and took a few aspects of hip hop and diluted it into easily digestible spastic-juice for the masses. Your EDM “stars” are all gimmicky sellouts in it mainly for the fame and money and It’s mainly down to the huge population of ignorant brain-washed fuckwits who line their pockets and feed their ego’s.

    The bottom line is, it just makes the true heads cringe and shake our heads. I only hope a good percentage of you use this EDM sound as a stepping stone to discover the beautifully vast range of unique and authentic electronic music that already exists out there, and which is still being produced to this day. It’s not that hard to find ;-)

    • Zel
      January 17, 2013

      I’m well-aware of the “beautifully vast range of unique and authentic electronic music that already exists out there.” In fact, a few months ago I was at one of Lee Burridge’s All Day I Dream parties and wondered aloud with a friend if fans of Borgore were exposed to a set from Lee or Matthew Dekay, would they be won over? I’d hope so.

      Also, don’t try to step to my knowledge of “the scene.” I mentioned Airdrawndagger in there for a reason, and I challenge you to tell me its significance and the humor in its mention.

      • Stu
        January 18, 2013

        I don’t get the Airdrawndagger joke. Maybe cos i’m not American. All I know is it was quite a nice album released by Sasha which I still play from time to time when I feel like getting nostalgic. Don’t think the album was that warmly received if I remember rightly, but I thought it was decent.

        Can you explain???

        • Zel
          January 18, 2013

          It was one of the most anticipated albums of the “electronica” era in the late 90s and early 00s. As an artist album from one of the biggest DJs in the world it was meant to be a game changer in the US scene. But then when it was finally released, it was a commercial and critical disappointment on both sides of the pond and it signaled the definitive end of an era. People have utterly forgotten about it.
          At this point, it’s an inside joke about false hype, buzz, and predictions about “the next big thing” in dance music. I mention it with a knowing wink to those who remember. Frankly, I’ve never known anyone to claim they still listen to it, so good on you.

  21. ally
    January 17, 2013

    I’m blown away that dave mathews band was brough up in this!

  22. Heshan
    January 17, 2013

    Why Skrillex??? Like we dont have Jeff Mills over here!

  23. Nick
    January 17, 2013

    Don’t care about most of the article (the Vice one was funny and well written, this one is badly written lol) but I did take issue with the bit about how electronic music was boring before that awful crap that’s popular in America.
    That jump up brostep yanks love at the moment was big in England 5 or 6 years ago

  24. JJ
    January 17, 2013

    dude you’re killing yourself – not so softly.

  25. chris
    January 17, 2013

    this is the only line i have trouble with….(Besides, we’re frankly not quite sure how long this whole EDM thing is gonna last, so it’s better to pack ‘em in while we can.)

    • Zel
      January 17, 2013

      shhhh!! don’t tell anyone!

  26. Matt
    January 17, 2013

    Guess What?

    Nobody cares what you or the British kid’s thoughts are on EDM. In fact, nobody should care what anyone thinks about it. It’s dance, music, made with machines. Period.

    Like what you like, respect others for what they like.

    This “waste of time” articles, is nothing more than two people trying to convince themselves and others, who’s country is “cooler”.

    Btw, loved the Ted Mosby quote.

    • Zel
      January 17, 2013

      I think it’s just two music writers having a laugh (though I don’t dare speak for the other guy).

      you put it quite well:

      Like what you like, respect others for what they like.

  27. jimmy
    January 17, 2013

    Dear US ravers – you are unrefined cheesballs. As is most of Australia :)

    Cheese!

  28. rob burn
    January 18, 2013

    hahahahahaaaa this article is amazing. it just further illustrates the point made by vice..

    Yeh that skrillex video is the worst thing ive ever heard. Stupid fucking yank.

    • D
      January 18, 2013

      So true. This guy just consolidates the points made in Vice UK.

      The best thing about the Vice article is that it is what the whole rest of the world is thinking.

  29. Sean
    January 18, 2013

    “Just stand in the middle of a steamy crowd of thousands under the stars when Skrillex is playing “Cinema” and hear every sweaty glitter-bodied person around you shouting back the lyrics at the top of their lungs like they’re Gary Go and they just landed on the moon with a billion dollars and a pile of puppies. If that doesn’t melt your frosty Anglo heart, I don’t know what will. This – not your dad’s weak-ass 90s MDMA – is what defines ecstasy. We live for moments like these. These moments are why you, my British friends, might do well to learn a thing or two from us.”

    Oh dear god – if this is what you have to teach us? Please don’t ever come over here – that looks/sounds embarrassing……pure cringe!

    • Greg F
      January 18, 2013

      Yes it’s very embarrassing and it makes me want to cringe too. You guys over in Europe are so lucky that you don’t have be around this low-life behavior we are exposed to.

      • GT
        January 18, 2013

        Agree, Greg F, great call..we’re exposed to such debauchery and nonsense that it’s comical..i wish i could party at ministry of sound or any underground spot in London..it’s ingrained in their culture like it’s ingrained in my heart, and i think we deserve better here in the US

    • Oli
      January 18, 2013

      My favourite part as well. That sounds like the worse place I can imagine being to be brutally honest! And really don’t understand the “dads weak-ass 90s MDMA” quote? Again does this writer have a clue what he’s talking about? Ecstasy was much stronger in the 90s, the majority of modern ecstasy is nothing compared to what they were chomping down those days!
      Overall a huge fail from this writer, everything here reinstates exactly what us in Britain and Europe already think of the rave scene in America. He was possibly the worst representative possible, Skrillex? That’s really the best example you can think of? When you (writer) mention you suspect the scene will not last much longer you are half right. Artists like Skrillex and other bro-step shit that’s getting released at the moment will have shortlived careers, but the good music will continue to progress and blossom as it always has. In a way I’m quite thankful to the bro-step scene as it keeps that sort of crowd out of the real raves I go to. I don’t want hoardes of hipsters with glowsticks and their false appreciation of the music coming to and ruining the nights that are still as awesome as ever before!

  30. Jack
    January 18, 2013

    Still don’t get it…….. Never will. Who the fuck is DJ Kaskade? And who cares?

  31. Senorg
    January 18, 2013

    ‘The bottom line is that we don’t really care what you think about us.’

    You don’t care so much you wrote an entire article about it.

    • Oli
      January 18, 2013

      BOOM!

  32. househead
    January 18, 2013

    This has to be the one of the worst articles in the whole web! Im no brit or yankee, but the original was written from heart and soul, trying to tell you yanks that you are actually killing electronic music with your mainstreeeam culture. Everything you take turns into pop, which is SHIT! And the whole article is about spitting your yankee spit, refusing everybodys opinion and no matter what you are the best. Guess what, you are the only ones who think so! Never forget where you are from, because you might think you are the greatest but lads you are only the tip of the iceberg!

  33. Owen
    January 18, 2013

    As someone who was born and raised in America and then moved to Europe at 12 meaning I have now spent an equal amount of time in both places I must say from my experience America is wrong about everything about 99% of the time. You come across as spoiled little fat rednecks to the rest of the world. You don’t understand British humor because that vice article was fucking funny and on point. Anyone in the American scene who isn’t some skrillex loving bible bashing gun toting ‘merica fuck yeah lets go to edc and date rape girls wearing fluffys and titty tape type of person would have got the joke. It’s the difference between going to Ultra and WMC. The veterans of your scene knows whats up and they get the joke and we all laugh at the people the vice article is poking fun at. We don’t call it EDM we call it dance music. All music is electronic in some aspect, you need electricity to record it.
    You have already ruined Dubstep, now it’s time to grow up a little bit take the friendly advice instead of getting all douchy about it and join the rest of us instead of parading around singing America fuck yeah while you commercialize and rape everything.

    p.s. the food analogy was fucking typical, the rest of the world is always going on about how fat you all are. Bringing up food every chance you get doesn’t exactly help that image.

  34. Shamsul
    January 18, 2013

    A poor rebuttal. If anything you just made vice’s article more genuine. I was dubious at first, and although having a few laughs found it quite spot on. But this article just made it something more, this was a rebuttal based purely on spite and pride. As such, it’s meaningless.

    I didn’t know whether to laugh or cry when I reached the part about the drop. Like seriously? But I should be glad, whilst the morons are keeping skrillex busy, we’re free to enjoy the likes of finnebassen, solumun, maya jones cole, julio bashmore without the dickheads.

  35. Jack Stalker
    January 18, 2013

    American ignorance FTW. I know Clive and I can tell you he will have a great chuckle over this article.

    AMERICAAAAA – FUCK YEAH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! They know no fear, they know no danger, they know nothing.

    Oh and skrillex – lolz.

  36. shadowboxxer
    January 18, 2013

    Calm down. America effectively invented dance musi back in the early 80s. And nearly all dance music is electronic. So drop the EDM moniker and just call it dance music, drop a pill and enjoy the party.

  37. Americangirl
    January 18, 2013

    Wow, this American girl who got involved in the scene in the early 90′s feels embarrassed by this article! The vice article is a bit douchey and makes broad generalizations but it has alot of truth in it. AND it is meant to be funny. We take ourselves so serious.
    I have been watching this new explosion of rave culture. Skrillex? dubstep? To each his own, but my lord, this music is bad! I recently saw a news blurb that in some Miami club they asked DJ Shadow to stop his set early so the vip bottle service crowd could hear their cheesy music. WTF?! Have you not heard of Jeff Mills, Mark Farina, Derrick May, Richie Hawtin, Claude Young, Carl Cox, or Detroit techno or Chicago house? Every type of music has it’s place and if that’s what the kiddies are into so be it but that’s not real rave culture. It’s electronic pop music. It’s sucky.

    • HouseJunkie
      January 19, 2013

      I couldn’t agree more. What really saddens me about this whole Dub-step and “EDM” explosion is when you try to show all the Skrillex,Guetta,Dead Mau5,SHM,etc. fanatics out there something different they can’t digest it. They spew out and without so much as a taste of what it really is. They have such short attention spans that if they don’t hear the drop in the first 40sec of a track they lose interest. Forget about trying to introduce them to greats like Mark Farina, Frankie Bones, Frankie Knuckles, Carl Cox, BT, Paul Van Dyk, etc. Even when sharing artists like Bad Boy Bill, Dj IRene, and Naw-T-Boy( their older releases, before they became too similar to the current EDM zeitgeist {hell, even Hardcore and Breaks, and Drum and Bass/Jungle they don’t “have time for” ) they still can’t appreciate it. I have some younger friends that are heavily into Dub-step and worship the ground these modern EDM “Rockstars” walk on. Forget trying to explain the history of House, Techno, Trance, etc.( and GOD help you if you mention such genres as Northern Soul or Raregroove!) and the Legacy it’s founders and participants left us. I am embarrassed by the current state of things. Every time I mention I’m a Dj (proper Dj) it’s immediately “like Skrillex? or Dave Guetta?” NO. For the love of God, no.

  38. Tim Perkin
    January 18, 2013

    Mate you spent grey wrong.

    • Tim Perkin
      January 18, 2013

      spelt even…haha!

  39. IllegalDan
    January 18, 2013

    Lee Burridge? Matthew Dekay? Really? Try to drop these two names in a proper underground London, Paris or Berlin club, see how impressed they would be hahahaha. Granted they were good djs at some point but those days are long gone. (You’re only about 10 years late)

    • Zel
      January 18, 2013

      wasn’t trying to impress. but if you haven’t been to an All Day I Dream party, you don’t know what you’re talking about.

  40. ADV
    January 18, 2013

    i don’t think anyone had questioned the importance of america in starting the music (the detroit and chicago guys, but also other americans who do it well these days like levon vincent or dvs1)
    it’s just that you edm twats have the attention span of a fly and are pissing down on the true history of this music, since the originators (black, gay, whatever isn’t accepted in your “non-socialist” wonderland) were not marketable enough

  41. Loko
    January 18, 2013

    This text was good until Skrillex. Cannot believe a guy who apparently knows about the scene is actually supporting this shit music. Totally obnoxious garbage Dubstep. That’s why 14 years old kids love him, because they don’t know a shit yet.

    Also, about he rockstar DJs. They are mainstream shit DJs who does not play EDM. They are just popstars with a fucking turntable. Hell, they don’t even dj anymore. They just press play and laugh. Deadmau5 (who is also a popstar) already said that.

    Also, Kaskadade? HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

  42. Thisguy1313
    January 18, 2013

    I guess that I view the EDM scene differently. I am not there for the ‘scene’ or for the ‘drugs’ or the false sense of self-efficacy that is claimed by a lot of the morons jumping on the band-wagons for it here in the U.S… Truth be told, if it hadn’t been for American music industry dying a homogenized and self-inflicted death by marginalizing expression for mundane cookie cutter entertainers rather than musically focused artists, there never would have been an opening for it in the first place. The Europeans just basically babysat out love-child for a while until we were ready to embrace it again. And no one that truly loves the music, and the sheer PLUR that they get from going to Festivals like EDC, ULTRA, and others, really cares what influence is claimed where. I have been a raver since the 90′s after Tiesto left me mind blown… And have been hard-charging for EDM ever since. And the fact is that just because Flo-Rida likes to rip off Bingo Players songs, or Avicii does some collabos with David Guetta, or Kanye rips off some Daft Punk hooks, doesn’t sway my love of the experience. The problem is all of the morons who refer to all of the artists they hear as “techno” or “dubstep” and in actuality have no effing clue what they’re talking about… The saddest part of that, is those people are driving the surge in popularity for the rest of us.. So instead of being haters, we need to embrace the new fans and educate where we can. If you can’t do that for people wanting to enter our music sphere and enjoy it, then you don’tgt to brag or talk shit about the movement or claim it. Because it belongs to all of us. Stop being arrogant.

    • josh
      January 18, 2013

      agreed

  43. AmericansAreSoStupid
    January 19, 2013

    “escape from the confines of your socialist lives”

    Go suck Mitt Romney’s dick you stupid republican…your country is a joke, as are all you right-wing muppets who “rage” all day long and listen to “bangers” and “face melters”. You’ve been trolled by Clive, hook line and sinker.

  44. /samesstee
    January 19, 2013

    What appeared a interesting and funny read with some good points which (after spending some time in the states) I TOTALLY agree with yet am slightly embarrassed…. *****until you summed it up with a SKRILLEX concert video**** which totally justifies the point of the original post.

  45. Laurouu
    January 22, 2013

    I hate both authors of both of these articles. It’s not a war. Let each other enjoy what they like. So what if American music sucks? They like it. Leave ‘em be.

    Signed, your cousin of the north, Canada.